Are you taught to thrust or snap your front kicks in basics?

Discussion in 'General Taekwondo Discussions' started by Pleonasm, Jan 4, 2018.

  1. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    I was struck by how the WTF/KKW branching of Taekwondo appears to snap their front kicks in forms, which is not how front kicks are supposed to be executed in ITF TaeKwonDo. In fact, It's concidered incorrect/suboptimal in ITF:

    Here is the best example of how to throw a default front kick in my style:

    8:50

     
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  3. canadiankyosa

    canadiankyosa Active Member

    Watch Okinawans throw front and side snap kicks. You would be floored (pun intended). Yes, thrusting kicks have more mass (NOT weight ) behind them, thereby more power, but thrust kicks are slower and combos are a lot less (efficiently) likely. Also, when throwing multiple kicks, all but the last would be "snap kicks".

    An inefficient teacher removes a tool from a student's toolbox. That tool may be the one that works for a student. A smaller person has less mass so speed may be their forte. You teach a student everything, not only what you feel is effective.

    Does your instructor teach front leg roundhouse? If so, can you say snap kick? Does he teach crescent kicks? Inefficient and lacking lots of power, as I see it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2018
  4. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    I am not arguing which is better, just asking how you are taught the front kick. It is a fact however that the snap front kick is concidered a poor mans front kick in my style, at least in forms.
     
  5. Mario Ray Mahardhika

    Mario Ray Mahardhika Active Member

    Both, each has its own use. Just like @canadiankyosa said, snap kicks are combo friendly, while thrust kicks are more powerful. The video starts talking about front kick in 8:44, it shows exactly the same way WTF poomsae does front kick. In kyorugi, however, it would be too damn slow unless it's the last kick of your combo (but it's kinda seldom to do so as it's generally safer to do circular kicks than linear ones).
     
  6. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    Okey, I was surpirsed that the WTF has snap front kicks at all in their forms, which is a big no-no in ITF TaeKwonDo.
     
  7. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    Yeah but that's sparring. My question was about basics. Forms and stuff. I was a bit disgusted to see it rear its ugly face there.
     
  8. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Both variants exist and are taught.

    Which is used depends on the context.

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  9. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    I specified the context. Basics, that is forms and training for forms.
     
  10. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Depends on why you are learning the forms / basics, ie competition, moving meditation or for martial application. Both kicks are taught and practiced.

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  11. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    Both variants are in KKW/WTF patterns? They seem to snap it everytime.
     
  12. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Depends who is doing the form and why. Videos you may find online tend to be competition oriented.

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  13. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    I suspected that was the case. There is a "detractor" in KKW who criticizes the Tageuk forms conformity to WTF sparring. His objection being that techniques were switched around. What was originally supposed to be a block is now replaced by a head kick, making the forms disjointed and illogical. I wish I could I find it because he goes into great lenghts about the subject and is very knowledgeable historically on the patterns genesis.

    It appears that the snap front kick phenomenon in patterns is another part of that evolution.
     
  14. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Horses for courses. Snapped kicks are arguably prettier and lend themselves to speed and height, therefore are suited to presentation weighted competition.

    The link between sparring and poomsae is not immediately obvious, but is there.

    I won't comment on your opinion of someone elses opinion who isn't here and has not been quoted, that doesn't make sense.



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  15. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    What I mentioned was the compete opposite. Some people within the KKW feel the link to modern-day sparring has been retroactively imposed with the Taeguk forms, in an anachronistic fashion.
     
  16. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Again, hearsay. I won't comment.

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  17. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

  18. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

  19. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    I am asking if you have heard of this before. Since you are one of the last defenders left of TKD, I have nobody else to ask. This forum has 5 active members.
     
  20. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I wouldn't say I was one of the last with 80 million practitioners worldwide.

    I think the poomsae and sparring have little in common on the surface, but the underlying principles are the same. I don't believe that sparring, especially competition sparring has had much influence over the poomsae, in that sparring is the application of a subset of the underlying principles of poomsae, rather that vice versa.

    People write a lot of stuff online, of greater or lesser veracity.

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  21. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Member

    Most of which are children and adolescence. Just because some adults train it doesn't mean they believe in it. The ones in my club know full well its limitations, especially seniors who crosstrained. Everybody knows Kyokushin is the big boy of the eastern striking arts.
     

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