Are you taught to thrust or snap your front kicks in basics?

Discussion in 'General Taekwondo Discussions' started by Pleonasm, Jan 4, 2018.

  1. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    It is still Taekwondo. I don't see why you don't understand that.
     
  2. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Sport is a tiny subset of Taekwondo. If he's involved with sport at olympic level, then he's not thinking about hoshinsul as part of his syllabus, is he?



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  3. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    He wasn't talking about himself in particular or WT/WTF TKD. It was a statement regarding the KKW and its syllabus. Your statement that it is a necessary component is false.
     
  4. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I'm questioning what kind of view he would have of that as a sport instructor.

    It is a necessary component according to the KKW textbook 2006 ed. I think they know better that you or him.

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  5. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    I made the claim that grappling is a mandatory part of Taekwondo, simply because it is mandatory in the ITF, to which he corrected me that it is not true of the KKW. That was the root of the discussion.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2018
  6. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Well, in terms of the minimum requirements set out for grading, he's technically right, BUT and it's a big but, the vast majority of schools affiliated with the KKW where civilian non elite Taekwondo is practiced, especially where the affiliation is via a formal governing body, include hoshinsul as a mandatory element of their grading structure.

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  7. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Further to this, it is already a part of the KKW Master Instructor's course since 2012 and the Hoshinsul syllabus has been greatly extended for future dissemination. So to say that it is not an integral part of the art is not really correct.

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  8. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    There's hoshinsul in some of the patterns anyway. Clockwise and counter clockwise joint manipulation for an example.
     
  9. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Movements in the forms without some kind of hoshinsul application are in the minority.

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  10. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Formal demonstration of Honshinsul must contain grappling/joint manipulation. it's indistinguishable from one step sparring otherwise. There is some joint manipulation in the ITF forms, though hardly forming a majority of the techniques.
     
  11. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Most of the sequences from the Taegeuk forms can be viewed as blended control and striking techniques. These applications are a far cry from one step, mainly because of the different distances involved and the rather more concentrated targeting of strikes.

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  12. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Blocks require a strike from the opponent, this trespasses into 1-step very easily. The majority of ITF tull techniques are blocks and strikes. In Honshinsul, the context usually involvs the demonstrater being grabbed.
     
  13. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Hoshinsul also covers defence against strikes and kicks. It does tend to be demonstrated at low level using grabs.

    It's different to one step in that one step tends to be pure PBK applications, as an intermediate stepping stone.

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  14. Finlay

    Finlay Active Member

    front snap kick is a part of ITF forms.

    DoSan for example
     
  15. canadiankyosa

    canadiankyosa Active Member

    Snap kicks would be, and are, basics in many arts. Traditional martial arts are flawed in many ways us as, for a sample:

    1. straight punching above/below shoulder height
    2. using straight punches only
    3. the strongly possible myth that snap kicks are bad on the knee due to the sudden pullback
    4. that the front foot must land at the same time as the punch
    5. that fully extending the arm on a punch gives more power (get hit by a good boxer's hook punch)
     

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