before and after patterns

Discussion in 'Taekwondo Patterns' started by Finlay, Nov 4, 2014.

  1. Finlay

    Finlay Active Member

    Hi there

    quick question to get people thinknig (hopefully)

    if you have a very uncodridnated student what movement would you teach them to prepare them for patterns. I know that the Saju series is for this but what extras would you add

    Also what would you do after patterns as a bridge to applications, other set sparring
     
  2. Matthias F. Duelp

    Matthias F. Duelp New Member

    firstly one could think about a little chi gong, or similar to prepare for more complex movements.
    secondly, to bridge the gap between pattern and sparring is an almost impossible mission, since patterns were historically a summary or mnemotechnical systems of complete selfdefense-schools. As this they won't provide any working principles or techniques for duelling (i.e. two man combat sports) But that point of view is a bit like opening Pandora's box ...
     
    Oerjan likes this.
  3. Finlay

    Finlay Active Member

    "secondly, to bridge the gap between pattern and sparring is an almost impossible mission, since patterns were historically a summary or mnemotechnical systems of complete selfdefense-schools. As this they won't provide any working principles or techniques for duelling (i.e. two man combat sports) But that point of view is a bit like opening Pandora's box ..."

    I agree with you that sparring and patterns have become two very seperate entities, My question was not about applying patterns to sparring but the applicication of the movements in practical situations
     
  4. truejim

    truejim Member

    Maybe you could use some variation of the old taekwondo Kicho Hyeong. Wikia has a taekwondo wiki whose URL this forum won't let me enter. taekwondo dt wikia dt com

    Search for "Comparison of Beginner Forms"
     
  5. Royen

    Royen New Member

    Hi Finlay,

    I want to ask you how much time it will take to learn complex movements while learning taekwondo?
     
  6. Finlay

    Finlay Active Member

    i am not tryng to be funny but....

    Can you give me an example of a complex move

    and also what do you mean by 'learn'?

    - to just do the movement?
    - to do the movement with a high level of technical understanding and ability?
    - to be able to apply the movement in a controled situation
    - to be able to apply the movement in a live situation be it sparring or self defence

    The movement in the patterns of Taekwondo are for the most part fairly straight forward as far as complexity goes, espcially when compared with some of the Chinese styles. However, once you start breakthem down in to details it can get quite frustrating to get them very correct, this would include such things as, correct tension, proper weight shifting, body co-ordination etc.

    the sparring and self defence techniques should be, by nature, simple but the challenge there is to be able to pull them off wheny you need them.
     
  7. Royen

    Royen New Member

    Here by learn I mean to say - to be able to apply the movement in a live situation be it sparring or self defence.

    This means we need to practice hard to get things done in the right way
     
  8. Matt

    Matt Member

    Years of repetition and practice
     
  9. Matt

    Matt Member

    I don't think I quite understand the question at hand Finlay. We, meaning at my school, have many uncoordinated students and we usually teach them patterns like everyone else. Sometimes it's at a slower pace but we by no means modify or lower our standards.
     
  10. Finlay

    Finlay Active Member

    The patterns are the patterns and shouldn't be changed, dumbing down patterns leads down a very slippery slope.

    What I was referring to was drills to improve co ordination, especially when applying the patterns.

    Yes, we can say that you simply apply the patterns, but to me that leads to 'gaps' in the movements
     
  11. Matt

    Matt Member

    Oh yes I totally agree. Although often times simplifying moves happens due to a master changing the way they want things done. For example all students at our school do the two hand preps for rising and low block. Meaning backs of the hands together blocking hand on the inside carried high by the ear. But, we allow the little dragons (ages 3-5) to use more of a one handed prep. The blocking hand by the ear with the other arm held straight in front of them. This is mainly because the whole idea of using two hands is a little too complex for three year olds. But, as they move forward and get older we introduce them to the idea of two hands before they are allowed to move into the regular student body.
     
  12. Finlay

    Finlay Active Member

    I include a few drill I borrow from my kali training as an aside to application training.

    I find this build co ordination an d the two hand idea.

    The fighting I teaching is half way between grappling and striking, so grab and hit, to do this you need to be able to use two hands. Co ordination is importat
     

Share This Page