Board and Brick Breaking.

Discussion in 'General Taekwondo Discussions' started by Matt, Aug 21, 2016.

  1. Matt

    Matt Member

    I want to leave this question extremely open, so what is your take on board and brick breaking? Maybe include personal best with dimensions of course, and anything else relevant.

    Personally I have broken a 5 board side kick and 5 board front kick. The boards being 1in thick and I don't know the height with no spacers. I also as of yesterday successfully broke 5 cement bricks with my step side kick. The bricks are 3in thick and are unsupported with a 1/4 in spacer.
     
  2. Matt

    Matt Member

    I'd also love to hear new ideas for board/brick breaks because I am always trying to challenge myself. I have done kicks such as 540 hook kicks and all types of power breaks along with weirder ones such as a speed hammer fist help by myself and a knife hand strike palm up while dropping the board so it is hit when totally in the air.
     
  3. canadiankyosa

    canadiankyosa Active Member

    Did you buy the boards or did you cut them? Boards bought are 3/4 inches thick not 1 inch. Using spacers is, simply, cheating. Want a challenge, try avoiding the dangerous and, especially, unhealthy hard breaking. Soft breaking (gravity breaking on 4" wide x 15" long x 2-3" thick cinder blocks) is, actually, more difficult and anyone healthy, even the elderly, can do the breaks with no issues (any break can harm the bones in the wrist and hand but soft has about 5-10% chance). On boards, try unsupported breaks. Hang boards by string or just the board top with two fingers. For those foolish for hard-style breaking: try soaking the boards in water for a 2-3 hours.
     
  4. Matt

    Matt Member

    We buy and cut our own boards but we use 1in thick boards. I only ever use spacers on concrete bricks. And actually spacers make it more difficult if the space between the boards is large enough. Think about taking a hammer fist and having to hit two boards that are 6 inches apart from eachother. You cant simply hit the first board and pull back you have to demonstrate the follow through and keep the power downward and at the same level all at the same time.
     
  5. canadiankyosa

    canadiankyosa Active Member

    Doing a "spacer break", I think, is more about speed and, as you said, follow-through rather than "power" per se. Also, when spacers are used, the board above assists (dominoes) in breaking the one below. I did a samagui (back of the wrist like a chicken beak) break two boards spaced out and succeeded. Done with no space, at all, I made the decision not to so again. Two boards, not spacer equals a two inch board while two spaced out equal two one inch boards. :)
     
  6. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    I loved it around your age. Nowdays concider it a braindead activity of TMA.
     
  7. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Wow, condescending, patronising and insulting in one hit. Well done.
     
  8. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I find breaking useful for practicing and proving certain skills. It's also great as a crowd pleaser at demos.

    I tend to choose breaks for myself that other people don't do, or unusual techniques that people aren't generally aware of.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     
  9. Matt

    Matt Member

    With all due respect sir I would love to hear your reasoning for this statement.
     
  10. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    My reasoning is very simple: boards don't hit back. What exactly have you guys proven? Try that against a human skull... which is significantly harder than anything you can get your hands on.
     
  11. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    One thing breaking proves is that the practitioner can form and use a striking tool in such a way that they can hit a solid hard target without injuring themselves.

    Which is more than can be said for say, boxing with gloves on.

    In a very real sense boards do hit back when you fail to break.

    As for trying it on a skull, many of the techniques used for breaking are actually intended for somewhat softer, more vulnerable targets. Just because the wood breaks doesn't mean the opponent will. It's just a test.

    One example of a skill breaking can prove is the ability to develop power over a short distance, which is an invaluable skill for instances where the opponent is hitting back.

    Just like every other aspect of martial arts and martial sport, breaking develops fighting applicable skills in a safe, isolated, non-fighting environment.

    I have one answer for people who say boards don't hit back: get your boxing gloves on and mouth guard in, and let's spar. I'll show you what skills it develops.

    They usually concede after the first short power liver shot.
     
  12. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Your pathetic bragging aside, "boxer" is incredibly generic. Some are absolutely terrible, and most don't know how to defend against kicks, since the've never recieved or thrown one.

    Ever tasted a leg kick? I see WTF guys crumble whenever they collide in sparring. One leg kick to these people from a Thai guy and they are out.
     
  13. Anthony Nash

    Anthony Nash New Member

    I think I'm getting a bit too old to be worrying if anything, person, wood or otherwise, is going to hit me back. The effort and dedication to perform techniques to a high skill (which will include desctruction/breaking) is enough in its own right. As with the practitioner who can perform a side piercing kick 180 degrees from the floor (right above the head). Totally pointless in one sense, but the skill and dedication is incredible and respectable.
     
  14. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    You are missing the point, as usual.

    I'm not bragging nor am I saying anything about the efficacy of boxing, I'm making the point that skills developed and proven via breaking have a very real combative application.

    I'm not going to get into a style versus style argument, because they really are for beginners.

    Yes, I practice leg kicks and defenses against them. Have you actually gained any contact experience yet, or are you still a beginner?
     
  15. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Good for you. Yes I have had contact experience. I have fought for real too so it's not like earth shattering. Haven't tried leg kicks though. I was thinking of suggesting it outside of class. Somehow don't think anybody in there would be up for it.
     
  16. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Point is that it can all be accomplished through brute force. It's fake.... Every notice that it's a gap between bricks?
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2016
  17. Anthony Nash

    Anthony Nash New Member

    Force is force, brute or skillfully applied. Whether an individual is able to recognise the difference between the two is another matter entirely.
     
  18. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    No it can't, no it isn't, and not always.

    I know plenty of big guys who really struggle with power breaking. They have plenty of brute force, but poor technique.

    If you think it's fake, let's see you fake it.
     
    Anthony Nash likes this.
  19. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member




    I rest my case...
     
  20. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Dude, that's not really even a board, and in no way a power break.

    If you wanna rest your case on that, then that tell us how little you understand.
     
    Matt likes this.

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