Common uncorrected mistakes

Discussion in 'Taekwondo Patterns' started by NoBullShitFighting, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. NoBullShitFighting

    NoBullShitFighting Active Member

    Common uncorrected mistakes

    The premise in this thread is that we all suggest one common mistake per post in a pattern we wished got corrected more often.

    Example:

    A common mistake that is really easy to correct is in the WTF pattern Il-jang, gwe Keon, is that beginners forget to pivot on the ball of their feet in every turning movement, in particular 90 degree ap-kubi area maki+baro chirigy, an momtang maki and egul maki. This makes them end up approximation ap-koobi distance behind their starting position if they do it every time. On the other hand, if they do pivot on the ball of their feet they should with practice be able to easily end up at the starting position.
     
  2. RTKDCMB

    RTKDCMB Active Member

    I don't know about uncorrected but one common mistake in Toe San Hyung (Chang hon) that students do is movement 23 which is a spin into a horse riding stance, most beginners go into a back stance when they first learn it, as in the previous pattern. I used to do it when I was a beginner as well. Nothing really stays uncorrected for long you may have to correct it a few times here and there but it always gets corrected when it is observed.
     
  3. Oerjan

    Oerjan Active Member

    There are so many:) Some mistakes that are barely noticeable in Taegeuk Il (1) Jang will really be showcased in the later forms. For instance: Just before kicking front kick most beginners take a small extra step forward with their non kicking foot. There is only one kick to each side in Taegeuk Il (1) Jang but in the next form Taegeuk I (2) Jang there are toward the end of the form three kick and punch sequences. If you look at the practisioners doing this form you will see that most will take an extra step in between. Once you start looking at this you will notice the same mistake being done at all poomsae. I have even noticed that some high ranking masters are doing it without thinking.. There should of course be no extra step taken as one of the points of basic and poomsae practise is to remove uneccesary movement and telegraphing. Taking an extra step takes longer and it really gives away your intention to do "something".

    Also there is a tendency for many when moving from one ap koobi (long front walking stance) to another one where they first turn their front foot 30 degrees, then move. This is also telegraphing and should be removed. The correct is to move without telegraphing and then the back foot will turn about 30 degrees out anyway at the end of the movement.

    I think those are the two most common mistakes being done, and as they are universal they show up in just about all the poomsae if it is not corrected early in their training or as in my own case, noticing it 5-6 years into my training and working my ass off to remove it:)
     
  4. NoBullShitFighting

    NoBullShitFighting Active Member

    Sharp observations! There is this video of some guys doing a rare and frankly wierd blackbelt-pattern posted a while back by RTKDCMB called aweful demonstration of martial art. Those guys are stepping all over the place.
     
  5. John McNally

    John McNally Active Member

    Making the move but not understanding why, therefore no realism or true application. (sorry couldnt resist)
     
    Josh, NoBullShitFighting and Chris J like this.
  6. Oerjan

    Oerjan Active Member

    You are not alone in thinking this:)

    Taegeuk Sam (3) Jang Dwit Koobi (Back stance) hansonnal bakkat makki (single knife hand block), changing into ap koobi (long front walking stance) and momtong jireugi (midle section punch).

    Many green belts move their back foot instead of the front foot when transitioning from back stance to front stance. This makes the punch almost redundant in that all the power moving forward in their arm is moved backwards with their stance. Moving the front foot however insures the body weight and range is good for getting the power of the technique into the target.

    Another common mistake is when turning 180 degrees to repeat the combination that many move their front leg (the left) into back stance when it is suposed to be the right leg moving into back stance. This is a detail I think few instructors bothers with, and I guess there are about a 50/50 chance of the performer you are watching are doing this correct as a result:p It might seem trivial, but the body weight transfer is very different when transitioning with either the right leg (body weight backwards) or left leg (body weight forwards).
     
  7. Oerjan

    Oerjan Active Member

    You are not alone in thinking this:)

    Taegeuk Sam (3) Jang Dwit Koobi (Back stance) hansonnal bakkat makki (single knife hand block), changing into ap koobi (long front walking stance) and momtong jireugi (midle section punch).

    Many green belts move their back foot instead of the front foot when transitioning from back stance to front stance. This makes the punch almost redundant in that all the power moving forward in their arm is moved backwards with their stance. Moving the front foot however insures the body weight and range is good for getting the power of the technique into the target.

    Another common mistake is when turning 180 degrees to repeat the combination that many move their front leg (the left) into back stance when it is suposed to be the right leg moving into back stance. This is a detail I think few instructors bothers with, and I guess there are about a 50/50 chance of the performer you are watching are doing this correct as a result:p It might seem trivial, but the body weight transfer is very different when transitioning with either the right leg (body weight backwards) or left leg (body weight forwards).
     
  8. Oerjan

    Oerjan Active Member

    I saw that movie and thought that they could not really gain any benifit whatsoever from their forms practise... They did it so fast that they got nothing out of it. Forms practise is not directly combat practise, those guys really took the forms practise = combat practise misunderstanding to the extreme...
     
  9. John McNally

    John McNally Active Member

    A common incorrect technique is in Choong Moo after the Doo Palmok Makgi (double forearm block), as the student lands in Annun Sogi (walking stance) many i notice use the Orun (right) arm to perform a Nopunde Anaero bakat makgi (high section inward outer forearm block), it is actualy meant to be a Nopunde Dung Joomuk tearigi (high section back Fist Strike) to the Philtrum.
     
  10. RTKDCMB

    RTKDCMB Active Member

    In the system I study the technique after the double forearm block is actually the outer forearm block to the front followed by the backfist to the bridge of the nose to the right so it's interesting that what maybe correct in one organization may be incorrect in another.
     
  11. John McNally

    John McNally Active Member

    Very true RTKDCMB and its best to always follow the instructors guidance at the school, just as a point though in the book and encyclopaedias it is a back fist strike.
    No offence intended in any way
     
  12. RTKDCMB

    RTKDCMB Active Member

    There is no offense taken different organizations simply have different ways of doing things than whats in the book.
     
    John McNally likes this.
  13. Ndnoakes

    Ndnoakes New Member

    Hi John,
    In Volume 10, on page 266, this shows that an inward outer forearm block follows on from the double forearm block and then into the backfist, and the ITF videos on YouTube confirm this too. Am I missing something? Don't want this to come across as aggressive or anything, just trying to clarify :)
     
  14. NoBullShitFighting

    NoBullShitFighting Active Member

    Yok Jang, Gam.

    Movement #26

    Stepping backwards by moving front foot, instead of moving hind leg.
     
  15. John McNally

    John McNally Active Member

    I stand corrected Ndoakes, may I ask what version you have as my copy shows the move on page 244.
     
  16. Ndnoakes

    Ndnoakes New Member

    I'm not entirely sure which version it is to be honest, doesn't seem to have a page detailing this... :)
     
  17. John McNally

    John McNally Active Member

    What year ?
     
  18. Ndnoakes

    Ndnoakes New Member

    I really can't see a year anywhere... I have PDF versions from Blue Cottage TKD.
     
  19. John McNally

    John McNally Active Member

    Ahhh okay,it's because it's a PDF it throws the page numbers out...
     
  20. Ndnoakes

    Ndnoakes New Member

    Ah OK, well glad I could help :)
     

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