explosive power traiing for tournaments advice ?

Discussion in 'Taekwondo Sparring' started by michael mckenna, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. michael mckenna

    michael mckenna Active Member

    Before doing competitions like a month or so before should u work on eplosive power more then push ups,sit ups ect.. got 3 competitions this year gonna win them all
     
    Intercept likes this.
  2. bowlie

    bowlie Well-Known Member

    You should do both, but shift the focus towards doing more explosive work and just enough endurance to maintain what you have
     
  3. michael mckenna

    michael mckenna Active Member

    I thought of using a weighted rope to skip to help continues tuck jumps
     
  4. bowlie

    bowlie Well-Known Member

    that would be great for the supply part of power, i.e. anaerobic energy production, but you should also include something that requires maximal force production in your muscles. Something like explosive squats / jumps / explosive clap pressups.
     
  5. michael mckenna

    michael mckenna Active Member

    On my upper body days which is monday and wednsday at the end of my routine i do as many clappy push ups i can without losing speed. On tuesdays and thursdays on my leg days at the end of that routine i do as many tuck jumps as i can without losing speed. Friday is cardio and swimming day saturday and sunday are my couch potato days with the occasional walk to the shop lol
     
  6. michael mckenna

    michael mckenna Active Member

    Also monday wednsday and thursday is tkd class for 1 hour in the evening . Tuesday and friday evening is bjj for two hours each
     
  7. Intercept

    Intercept Member

    I just competed and realized I need to up my conditioning even more. I hate gassing out! So squats are good? Running?
     
  8. Kiup83

    Kiup83 New Member

    What you need is some kind of interval training a couple of times a week, that'll increase your anaerobic capacity allowing you to recover faster from the short bursts of action. It'll also increase your aerobic capacity a bit too.
     
    Intercept likes this.
  9. Kiup83

    Kiup83 New Member

    I recommend searching google for plyometrics, start there. Also, really focus on being explosive in every kick and when practicing footwork during training, that will help a lot.
     
    Intercept likes this.
  10. bowlie

    bowlie Well-Known Member

    Good to see you taking an interest in strength and conditioning training. If you look at the difference between pro athletes and amature athletes, the biggest difference is usually the speed they can move and preform at. Its phenomenal, so the role of strength and conditioning is really to improve speed. This includes getting faster, and being able to stay fast. The movements you make are powered by muscle contractions in your body, so the harder and faster your muscles can contract, the faster you will be. The cost of this is that you use more energy. Increase the horse power of a car and it will go faster, but also run out of petrol quicker, so you need to work on conditioning side of it to be able to maintain speed. I will mention here that the main aim of the 'strength' part is speed, not strength, so to use the example of the car you want acceleration, not top speed. However, if your car can only reach 70MPH, the 0-60 time is going to be quite high, so to improve that you need to increase the top speed. Barbell squats are amazing for increasing your strength (top speed).

    Now, onto the conditioning. How quickly you gas is determined by supply and demand. The supply part of this is how much energy is provided by the three energy systems. The demand part is how energy efficient your muscles are (muscle endurance). Muscle endurance is all about finding the right balance of fast and slow twitch fibers. Fast twich are, as they sound, faster at contracting and are often found in the legs of sprinters for example. The cost for this speed is they are not efficient. Slow twitch on the other hand are found in the legs of marathon runners, and also parts of your body like around the lungs and inside joints like the rotator cuff. This is because the stabilizing muscles of joints and the spine e.c.t. need to be able to work all the time, so they cant get tired. The downside is although they are efficient, they contract slower. Both of these types are a generalization, as really you have a whole spectrum throughout your body, but you can shift it in one direction or the other if you train right.

    Now, the supply. Your body uses a chemical for energy. Think its called ATP. It can produce this in many ways. When you breath oxygen in, it is used to break down fat and burn it for energy. This is the aerobic system and it can work indefinatly, but only provide a small amount of energy. It also has the Anaerobic system. This creates energy in the absense of oxygen by creating an oxygen debt. There is also a small amount of PCr found in the muscle. this is the quickest form of energy to use, so its like emergency energy incase you are chased by a bear or something. Sprint flat out for a bit. You can run really fast for about 7 seconds, and then you will start to slow down. that first initial 7 seconds was the muscles using the PCr, and after that your running off of the anaerobic and aerobic systems. At some point you will need to slow down again as the anaerobic system fatiuges.

    There is complicated interplay between the three, so all are important, so do all three forms of training. Aerobic, anaerobic, and muscle endurance. If you want, I will write you an article on this? Have a look few some of my other posts here for more information untill then. Good luck
     
  11. canadiankyosa

    canadiankyosa Active Member

    Pushups and weights are always secondary for power. Power is from acceleration X distance (x mass somewhat). Work on speed and over distance, as that is what useable (explosive) power is, and the power will come. It is mainly a myth that added bulk equals tonnes more useable power, but it does not. I have mentioned before, that size does not necessarily equal more power. Ask the 5' 7 ", 135 pd, late and great Bruce Lee about power and size. Focus on sport specific training. Punching and kicking combos are the best. Relax and focus on proper body mechanics for the sport. Look at all the great fighters. None were bulked up. but packed a punch, The bigger winners, though, were the non-bulky. Avoid bicycling and such. Stay with walking, running, and, mainly, sport specific exercises (walking, light jogging are okay), specifically bag, target, and sparring drills.
     
  12. Oerjan

    Oerjan Active Member

    I would ask you to google the Tabata method as well (interval training do 20 seconds high intensity and 10 seconds rest for 8 sets. That is 4 minutes of training but it is extremly hard training).
     
  13. bowlie

    bowlie Well-Known Member

    So much mis-information. Tabatas and intervals have their place, but you should be doing alot more. Weights are a staple for every single pro athlete. You might not want to add bulk, and thats fine. Have you ever tried to gain muscle? Its hard. Really hard. You have to do a bodybuilding program three times a week, limit cardio, eat 6 meals a day of just turky/tuna and brocoli. Its insane how hard it is to 'bulk up'. Furthermore, 'bulk' is determined by your diet. Lift heavy, eat normally and you will get stronger without getting bigger.
     
    Kiup83 likes this.
  14. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I agree on the misinformation. Tabata works great for building fitness, but to build explosive power a plyometric routine of box jumps etc supplemented with relatively light weights or kettlebell work with sport specific motions is a good way to go. You need to concentrate on building specific muscle fibre types for explosive motion from standstill, and the only way to do that it to train it as close to the application context as possible, with resistance.
     
    John McNally likes this.
  15. bowlie

    bowlie Well-Known Member

    Agreed, but it depends if we are talking about explosiveness, or the ability to mantain that explosiveness throuout a round.
     
    John McNally likes this.
  16. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Yup. Intervals for fitness, plyometrics for explosiveness, a combination for both, either as separate exercises or interval training with plyometric jumps/clapped pushups etc.
     
    John McNally likes this.
  17. bowlie

    bowlie Well-Known Member

    Intervals are only really effective if you already have a good aerobic base though. Despite claims to the contrary, they dont increase aerobic fitness past a very very basic level and even then you dont get everything you need. Intervals are effective in the comeptition prep stage, for muscle endurance and alactic power/ capacity. The majority of your time should be spend doing aerobic runs and lactic intervals (3-5 mins on, 1 min off or similar). I think I will write up an article for this in the health and fitness section, but I have a feeling people wont bother to read it.
     
  18. Oerjan

    Oerjan Active Member

    I have heard that Tabata is used extensivly within the weight lifting comunity. http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/the_tabata_method_perfected&cr= this was one article I came across with Tabata and weight lifting. Fusing strength training with interval training seems a good fit for competition Taekwondo in my own mind as you develop explosive power by trying to make the reps as fast as possible and it mimmics the competition sport (sudden bursts of energy followed by small breaks.. But by all means I am not a proffessional trainer and I will be the first to admit that my knowledge is lacking in this area.
     
  19. bowlie

    bowlie Well-Known Member

    Your training methods should be as sport specific as possible. I will go into this in more detail in a big post, but the closer it is to the sport, the more carry over. We cant do sport specific stuff all the time though. If we did heavy kicking sessions 7 times a week our knees would be in tatters within months, and our body would be in an over trained state. What you do to get over this is use a 'seasonal' approach. This means you will have a competition say, 3 times a year, and the space of time from one competition to the other is the season. You start the season with non-sport-specific workouts. This means you dont specifically use the same muscle groups or energy systems so that they have time to recover and repair. So your strength and conditioning would be things like long distance runs and weight lifting to increase the aerobic system and get stronger. Mid way way through the season you would start to use a more specific method, so you might focus on the anaerobic system more (taekwondo is a mixed sport, you need aerobic and anaerobic fitness, but aerobic adaptations are less specific and last longer, so you train them first.) and do some sort of explosive work. You are not mimicing the fight yet, but for your conditioning you might be doing lactic conditioning work with 5 min rounds. For your strength you might be focusing on creating explosive power in the legs. Its refered to as a 'conversion phase', becasue that strength you built earlier doesnt always carry over to better explosiveness. You need a conversion phase to, well, convert that increase in strength into an increase in explosiveness (this is where most people get it wrong. They dont have a good conversion phase, so they never see the gains of the strength phase, and therfore conclude that strength training is useless, when infact they just arent training properly). This might include plyometrics, medball slams, explosive jumps, dynamic lifts, as well as some weight lifting to maintain strength (whats the point building that strength if your going to let it fade away again?). The last stage is the fight prep stage. Is just before the competition, and its where you do you HIIT and things like that. You use sport specific movements like pad and heavy bag work, because those give you the most carry over, and you need that before the comp. You can do intervals of say, 20 seconds on, 10 seconds active rest for a 3 min round, or whatever your fight will look like to mimic it. The reason you use the sport specific movements is that HIIT is great for muscle endurance as well, so yo want to use the right muscles, and the right movements to capitalize on this. HIIT is great, but in small doses. 6 weeks of hard training will maximise the gains from it. After that, you wont improve any more, and its hard on the joints and nervous system, so you really need to contain it to the fight prep stage. Have mini-rest period pre-fight, have the fight, and then start a new season. Your body will be beat up and overtrained from the last few weeks of hard training, so you have a week or two off to recover, and then you start with the non-sport specific training again. Only this time, when you do your weights, lift a bit more, and when you do your runs, go faster or longer. Every time you complete a cycle your aim should be to improve everything, so each cycle should have you getting better and better. That is the basis of training for sport. Look up periodization and tapering for more information.
     
  20. bowlie

    bowlie Well-Known Member

    Double post
     

Share This Page