ITF Style blocks - how do I know whether the blocking hand is inside or outside the chambering hand?

Discussion in 'Taekwondo Patterns' started by JMcD, Nov 2, 2016.

  1. JMcD

    JMcD New Member

    When performing ITF blocking techniques, how do I know when the blocking arm should be on the inside of the chambering arm or on the outside of the chambering arm when performing the "crossing the arms" component of the pattern.
     
  2. Martin Harvey

    Martin Harvey New Member

    General rule of thumb is if the block is with the outer forearm then it starts on the inside of the chamber
     
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  3. amy

    amy New Member

    We were always taught almost all blocks were to be prepared inside the nonblocking hand during preparation. Exceptions included inner palm block which is to be prepared outside the nonblocking hand, and blocks that don't prepare with crossed hand such as front block or double knife hand, etc. Having said that, every instructor may have certain nuances. I've found that with time, this is one of those things that becomes automatic after countless repetitions. :)
     
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  4. Oerjan

    Oerjan Active Member

    If you use it strictly as a block (applying the end movement only and not the chamber it really does not matter. Inside or outside of the hand going back to the hip is only important if you apply the whole movement (my personal opinion). In kukki tkd all movements labelled makki has the "blocking hand" chamber on the outside of the pulling hand (the one going back to the hip).
     
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  5. Matt

    Matt Member

    Pure memorization works best. However most basic blocks all come from the same hand position. Let me explain: Rising or up block, down or low block, outer forearm block or side block, hooking block, knife hand block are just a few. These all come from the same hand position. The blocking hand is rotated palm towards the ear with the opposite hand facing away so the backs of the hands touch. Now there is a better way to understand this. If you think about each block individually we want each one to produce the most power we can get. This comes from four things. Twist, turn, push and pull. Each technique must have this to execute it to its highest level of effectiveness. If you think about a rising block the hands start in the position i outlined above. As the blocking hand moves up and away the palm twist out and its pushes. The non blocking hand slowly re chambers and pulls along with turning back to palm up. All blocks and strikes have the elements of this and if they do not you are doing a technique wrong.
     
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  6. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Matt it seems like you chamber differently to the KKW standard. Chambers begin behind the shoulder (an makki), on the shoulder (arae makki), or at the hip (olgul makki). The reaction hand begins either at the target (relaxed, not stretched), or at the shoulder or opposite hip depending on the block / technique.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     
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  7. Matt

    Matt Member

    The motions still contain twist, turn and push and pull.
     
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  8. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Of course, was just an observation
     
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  9. JMcD

    JMcD New Member

    Thank you.
     

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