Knee cocked down syndrome...

Discussion in 'General Taekwondo Discussions' started by Pleonasm, Jun 28, 2018.

  1. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Back to the thread just for a moment:) Can you verify if this is an OK method to deliver
    strength to eventually be able to go higher.?

    If I do this thousands of times and stick with my new stretching routine (which did wonders) will I be able to go higher?



     
  2. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    You need to work it out for yourself, but there are some drills that tend to work for most people.

    Concentrate on exercises for lifting the chamber position, and exercises to raise and hold full extension. Then work on the movement in between last.

    Just repeating the kick a lot wont do much. Leg lifts and chamber holds will, especially with graduated increases in weight.

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  3. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member


    When you write "leg lifts" , are you referring to side rising kicks and things of that sort?
     
  4. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Not it the traditional sense ie swinging. That type of ballistic stretching carries a disproportionate risk of injury compared to the speed of progress.

    By leg lifts, I mean controlled slow lifting with the aid of a wall or chair. Control your lean...

    Drawing small slow circles with the foot at full kick extension is also helpful.



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  5. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    But the problem is that I can't go higher than that with dolyo chagis, so what good would leg holds at low section do? It doesn't challenge my body. I hope you understand my dilemma.
     
  6. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    You work to your limit, and hold at your limit. Your limit will change. You will find that after 3 months of strength training your flexibility results will change. It's important to stretch for gains in ROM AFTER your strength and coordination training, not before. Pre-training stretching is only to mobilise and not for gains in ROM. Stretching for gain in ROM before strength and coordination training destroys your proprioceptive ability, weakens you temporarily, and increases likelihood of injury.

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  7. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    You should also be doing slow adductor flyes (Google this), lying flat and in candle pose. This will increase adductor strength, which is critical.

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  8. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    This?

     
  9. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    No this at 2:00 onwards



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  10. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Alright. I wonder if it's just a flexibility threshold I need to pass, and the height will ensue. A naturally flexible person could probably throw a high section, form proper dolyo chagi with ease right? And they don't need strong legs for that, just flexibility.

    It probably wouldn't hurt a fly but they could throw it?
     
  11. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    I think you're heavily overestimating my current flexibility... How am I supposed to pull that off when I can't even put the legs above my head? :(
     
  12. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Strength and flexibility are almost the same thing. People who are naturally flexible tend to have strength too - unless it's kid flexibility. Those who are flexible but not strong tend to injure themselves easily.

    Strength and Flex have a reciprocal relationship. If the muscle opposing a lift is not strong enough, it won't extend beyond the range your brain knows is safe. If the muscle assisting a lift is not strong enough, it won't be able to lift. It's all about strength training to make that reciprocal relationship work. Your muscles don't get longer, they get stronger, which allows your brain to learn a new safe limit for them.

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  13. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    You can lie on your back with your legs vertical, right? Initially forget resistance and let gravity do the work.

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  14. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Could you comment on the mechanics of my last clip? Was my knee action better here?

    I actively try and stop before crossing center line with the knee, but I don't know if I was successful or not.
     
  15. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Yeah but they will just be bent..
     
  16. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Then your starting exercise to get there is slow toe touches to high reaches to build your lower back strength and flexibility.

    With straight legs.

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  17. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Going back to the previous topic. My observations of the forms of the Kukkiwon and the ITF is that ITF sidekicks are more clinical and just straight up higher quality. The KKWs tend to kick beyond their means and compromise rotation and posture in the process. But....

    Dolyo chagis on the other hand looked waay sharper in Kukkiwon poomsae. More dynamic and less "balletic leg flicks" seen in ITF tulls.
     
  18. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I couldn't generalise. Both have good and bad proponents and qualities.

    The key to excellent kicking and improvement of one's own abilities lies in being honest with oneself and critical of oneself, and always working on the weaknesses rather than only playing to one's strengths.

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  19. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Yeah I am talking about sport forms now only. Sparring I couldn't say. The rules are too different between the two.
     
  20. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Even so, I couldn't generalise. At the top levels, there's little difference.

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