Kukkiwons new poomsae

Discussion in 'Taekwondo Patterns' started by Brent Read, Dec 30, 2016.

  1. Brent Read

    Brent Read New Member

    Any know much about the new Kukkiwon Poomsae. Is it for white belts and up and when is it required. Is there guides on the new techniques or as with the old do we make it up as we go along and then 10yrs later get corrected.

     
    John Hulslander likes this.
  2. Gazzer

    Gazzer Active Member

    Its for Competition I thought...
     
  3. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    They are for competition only, and so far only at the Asian Games in the later rounds.

    There is no need to learn this unless you plan on becoming an elite international poomsae competitor.

    They are frankly beyond all but the most talented practitioners due to the extremely technically demanding movements.

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  4. John Hulslander

    John Hulslander Active Member

    Thank you for sharing.
    Looks physically demanding. Something I would estimate 2% of the students I see are capable of.
     
  5. Mario Ray Mahardhika

    Mario Ray Mahardhika Active Member

    WOW! That really brings Kukkiwon Poomsae to a whole new level. The 540° kick alone is difficult to master, don't even mention the 720°. Browsing the channel, there are other 9 that makes it a total of 10 new poomsae.
     
  6. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Split by age category too. I see them as interesting, but I won't be learning them unless I need to. The individual techniques are already part of what we do.

    Maybe sometime at a judging seminar I'll pick them up, but I don't compete at that level so I won't be performing them.

    I don't view Poomsae as being particularly suited for competition, so this is a bit of extra fluff for the elite to me. Something more spectacular than the Taegeuk and Yudanja forms to make events more interesting to watch.
     
  7. Mario Ray Mahardhika

    Mario Ray Mahardhika Active Member

    Yes, that's why the fancy kicks aren't present in 50-60 category.
    Agreed. I'll let my poomsae athletes learn them by theirselves if they want, though. If they make it to elite level, I won't be their coach anyway.
    Now I don't agree with this one. Despite being very subjective in scoring (compared to Kyorugi at least), Poomsae serves well as a competition. Technical correctness, harmony, speed & power control, synchronization (in case of pair or team), etc. are just perfect points to consider. You don't always do them right in daily training, even (intended) worse in Kyorugi. The competition is also a pleasure to the eyes, besides the usually uncompeted demonstration (wish we have competed one here) at break time.
     
  8. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I dislike that the overbearing standardisation that comes with WTF competition judging standards has turned poomsae competition into an extravaganza of nitpicking, comparing robots. I much preferred to see competitive interpretations of poomsae before the rigid judging standards were introduced. I miss the level of creativity in rhythm and artistic interpretation. Modern competition poomsae is clinical and sterile to me. There's just not enough fire.

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  9. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    The double spins are uniquely WTF/KKW flashyness and fit's better with acrobatics than martial arts. One of the reason I dislike modern TKD.
     
  10. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I disagree. I think the challenge of those kicks is one that can only be met with a good understanding of or feel for body mechanics. Typically people who do these kicks well for demo purposes kick exceptionally well for martial arts purposes.

    Also, only the younger competitor's forms feature these kicks.
     
  11. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    No doubt, but that doesn't alter my view. I don't dislike the KKW based on whether they are skilled or not.
     
  12. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    No doubt. You don't seem to form opinion based on fact.
     
  13. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    It is not a factual matter whether double spins should belong to TKD. People can have different opinions on the matter.
     
  14. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    But they DO belong to TKD, and that IS a fact.

    Anyway, I was referring to your opinions in general, especially those you hold regarding KKW TKD.
     
  15. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    If you seek challenging body mechanics , there's plenty of acrobatic feats at your disposal which TKD hasn't adopted. I don't think it's a good criteria at all whether it's difficult or not. Completely beside the point.
     
  16. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    This post is beside the point. They belong to Taekwondo whether you like it or not. They are challenging body mechanics that develop and encourage exceptional kicking ability beyond that required for basic technique. Yes there are other acrobatic exercises, but not ones that will develop kicking mechanics so well.
     
  17. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    That's why I said that I don't like it. I don't think they should belong to TKD. I think it's bad representation of the art.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2017
  18. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    But, fortunately for us, you're not in control of what is and is not. So, there we are.

    Taekwondo is an evolving art. It is what Korea i.e. Kukkiwon and to a lesser extent ITF Korea says it is.

    You might disagree with that, you might say you're learning something original or traditional. But what that actually means is you are learning something that is becoming more and more defunct, out of date, and irrelevant to today's world.
     
  19. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Anyway, time for training. You know, actual martial arts!

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  20. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    So, what's your point? That doesn't make it worse.
     

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