Reflection

Discussion in 'General Taekwondo Discussions' started by Gnarlie, Oct 26, 2018.

  1. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Feel free to upload a video.

    It's not about winning in the dojang. It's about learning.

    In your dojang. In training. Sparring. Not competing.

    I really don't need to see you spar. Seeing you move for a couple of seconds at a time is enough to show you have massive flaws in your game that any experienced competitor could easily exploit if they wanted to and weren't trying to help you learn.


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  2. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    I don't enter their world... Their perception of range post kick is completely off against a counter puncher. They think they're safe when they're not.
     
  3. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Which is completely irrelevant since I don't kick in sparring against competitors (much).:cool:
     
  4. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    I agree and this could be requested, but the reality is that if it was not requested.. we banged, and pretty darn hard too. This I liked because you have to start somewhere and cooperation beyond a certain level is not going to improve you as it relates to sparring.
     
  5. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    You are in different worlds, that is correct. And you do not come close to entering theirs, that is also true.

    Oooor they're going easy on you and you're jumping in there like a prat. That's the problem with dojang sparring when the two participants have a different understanding of the aim. This problem solves itself in competition; both understand they are playing to win. Sooooo...compete or forever be doubted.


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  6. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Let's be clear here, while I have indeed sparred silver medalists, I have also faced dudes who at best reached the second rounds of the world championships. I don't think someone who constantly loses first or second round is worlds apart from me. I still liked the technique of the worst of the lot, though, which makes one wonder how much psychology comes into play. He looks more like a 4th or quarters guy. Is it common with underperformers among competitors, or why does he never go very far? Any theory?
     
  7. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Their competition experience places them worlds apart from you.

    Very different to dojang sparring.

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