Selecting and preparing brick for breaking.

Discussion in 'General Taekwondo Discussions' started by Mark 42, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. Mark 42

    Mark 42 Member

    In February I may be testing for 1st Dan.
    We can break a stack of boards, or a brick (we can choose).
    The brick is one of those cinder block bricks (like a paver) that goes on
    a block wall as a top cap. I think they are about 6 x 12 inch.

    My question is whether there is a standard size, where to get one, what
    to look for or avoid, and do you do anything like bake the moisture out
    of it to make sure it breaks the way it is supposed to?

    Should I wear a glove, go bare handed against bare brick, bare handed
    with a towel or even just a bandana on the brick?

    Any advice will be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Raymond

    Raymond Active Member

    At the hardware store, choose one that has been shielded from the elements. Sometimes they are left stacked exposed to rain and such instead of like in a bin or shelf. Baking it is cheating. If your technique is good and your hands are strong, mental preparation should be all you need. I don't think a towel or anything is needed till you start practicing breaking two bricks. But that's just my opinion.
     
  3. Master Fahy

    Master Fahy Active Member

    38314973D.jpg Mark 42, you can go to Lowe's or Home Depot to get your brick. Like Raymond said, you should get the brick that wasn't exposed to the elements. Buy a fairly new made brick, not one that has been there for awhile. Also, if you get the red brick you will find it much easier to break than the natural color one. Breaking is 90% mental, 10% physical. You shouldn't need any glove or towel... just your hand or foot. The best technique to break your brick the first time out would be the palm heel strike. Get two cinder blocks, then place the brick on top of the blocks, carefully place on the edge of both blocks.... then your ready to break! Good luck! Master Fahy
     
  4. Raymond

    Raymond Active Member

    These are the exact ones I use.

    [​IMG]

    They are item number 19192 (they don't have a barcode, the cashier types it in by hand). They cost USD $1.00.

    http://www.lowes.com/pd_19192-215-104804999_4294720418__?productId=3018997&Ns=p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1&pl=1&currentURL=?Ns=p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1&facetInfo=

    Master Fahy - The first brick strike I performed with was the hammer fist. What is the benefit of a first time brick breaker using iron palm over hammer fist? For me the hammer fist feels much stronger and less likely to injure a beginner breaker (but maybe that's just due to my specific anatomy since we sometimes have to tailor the art to ourselves to make it "our taekwondo").
     
  5. Master Fahy

    Master Fahy Active Member

    Raymond, the reason I suggested the palm heel strike for the first attempt at breaking is there is less chance of injury to the small bone on the side of the wrist. You can also get right over top of the brick using body weight verses just arm strength. I have had a 65 year old female student who weighted about 95 lbs. break her brick on the first shot with the palm heel strike. I would never have let her try breaking with the hammer fist. Master Fahy
     
  6. Mark 42

    Mark 42 Member

    Does anyone have good video links?
    Our instructor has us use hammer fist, but if I wanted to use palm heel strike
    I think he would allow me to. But, I don't know that technique (I think I can guess
    how it is done though).

    I bought a set of rebreakable boards, as well as one of the original early rebreakable
    board, which is tough to break (have not seen anyone break it with hammer fist yet).
    I can stand on it when it is on two bricks, and I'm about 165 lb.
    http://www.pbase.com/mark_42/image/153035739/original.jpg

    I guess I should try that old tough rebreakable for practice.
     
  7. Master Fahy

    Master Fahy Active Member

    Mark 42, You would do the palm heel strike straight down starting above the brick and hitting with the heel of your palm. Using a front stance raise up your front leg and as you strike the brick you land back into the front stance, this way your using your own body weight as well as your arm strength. You must be directly over the top of the brick striking straight down. I recommend using a loud kiyap as well. Master Fahy
     
    Mark 42 likes this.
  8. Mark 42

    Mark 42 Member

    Thank you.
    It seems (for me anyway) like breaking is where a good kihap is most important.
    I'm still nervous about breaking my hand though. If the brick doesn't break, something else probably will.
     
  9. Kimberly

    Kimberly New Member

    Do the heal strike and only the brick will break. I would NOT recommend punching the brick. I just did that for my second degree and broke 4 boards and my hand :rolleyes:. Afterward the grand master who was overseeing the test told me that a palm heal strike would have been a better option because you are using more than just your hand to break it. I see you are in Seattle. I am in Tacoma. If you would like to get together and go over it, I would be glad to help in anyway I can.
     
    Mark 42 likes this.
  10. Mark 42

    Mark 42 Member

    Thanks Kimberly - I'm actually closer to Tacoma than Seattle (Technically, one corner
    of our house is in Tacoma, the rest is in Federal Way).
    I'll talk to my instructor, practice with my rebreakable boards, and review some video for now
    When the time gets closer, if my confidence is still wavering, maybe I'll take your offer.
    It'd also be interesting to get someone's impression of how difficult that old rebreakable
    board is to break. I read in another forum that someone's instructor estimated it about
    like pine 3 boards, even though it is supposed to simulate one board.
    I was at a tournament down in Lacey last Saturday - next time I go to one I should post
    here and see if anyone wants to shake hands and meet in person.
     
  11. Kimberly

    Kimberly New Member

    My husband works in Federal Way :). Where do you practice TKD?
     
  12. Mark 42

    Mark 42 Member

    I go to International Martial Arts. It's at the corner of 312th and Pac Hwy, on the
    same corner as the Jack in the Box. (There's also one at 21st and 312th/Dash Point).
     
  13. Master Fahy

    Master Fahy Active Member

    Breaking is about 90% mental and 10% physical. You you believe you can do it and you know how to do it, you will do it! If you don't believe you can do it, you won't! Master Fahy
     

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