Speed Training

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by akisbat, Jun 21, 2014.

  1. akisbat

    akisbat Member

    I am looking to give my kicks and punches more speed. So I want to ask, what could someone do to achieve that ? Just train and try to be faster or are there specific methods ? And will running do any good about that ?
     
  2. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Slow down your motions and concentrate on only using the protagonists - the muscles that control the motion to the target. Many people are slow because they are tense, and their muscles are working against one another. Read up about reciprocal inhibition.

    Eliminate unnecessary motion - every technique should take the shortest path to it's target and every step sequence should use the fewest number of steps to get to the desired position.

    Sprint and hill running and plyometric exercises will help with explosiveness, but you'll gain more from brushing up your technique and relaxing your motions. Focus on throwing techniques, and think about where in the motion you want the power phase to be e.g. for most strikes, tension is only required momentarily at the point of contact, the rest of the motion is completely relaxed.

    Last but most important: trying too hard is counter productive. Relax and give it time. Work on accuracy first, then speed, then power comes with time. If you try to force speed or power, tension results and makes you slower.
     
  3. akisbat

    akisbat Member

    Great advice Gnarlie, thanks !
     
  4. Mario Ray Mahardhika

    Mario Ray Mahardhika Active Member

    Adding to Gnarlie's first advice, try to do techniques slowly, and hold up for a few seconds at the maximum stretched position, then again slowly, move back to the ready position. This will train your muscles to carry heavier burden at longer time, which in turn increase your ability to move around your body parts easily. Flexibility should be improved as well for better results. Search for "Chloe Bruce", you'll see how her flexibility helps her kick fast.
     
  5. canadiankyosa

    canadiankyosa Active Member

    To add to Gnarlies: Do dynamic stretches for kicks as well, since this is the same as the kicking motions in the three directions: side, front, and back. Alternate kicking very slow and accurately with kicks thrown like a jab: fast and quick.

    Avoid most running unless you get the full range of motion in the muscles. The same goes for extensive bike riding. These inhibit martial arts required flexibility
     
  6. akisbat

    akisbat Member

    Thank you all for helping ! :)
     
  7. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    There's one more thing Akisbat: work on getting your foot back down and back to balance quickly. This is the area most people overlook, but more than 50% of your kick time is recovery!
     
  8. Mario Ray Mahardhika

    Mario Ray Mahardhika Active Member

    I was just about to add that. But well, you're faster :)

    Akisbat, in case you wonder about this, this is my theory:

    the time you need to do multiple kicks = time for first kick + time for bring the kicking foot down + time for second kick + time for bring the kicking foot down + ...

    According to my observation, most (relatively new) trainers (say less than a year) will concentrate only on the odd factors, which is the time required for kicking. That's why when they start doing multiple kicks, either alternating or using the same foot, they find it slow. As soon as they're trained to put the kicking foot down as fast as they lift it, their multiple kick will considerably faster.

    For your reference, I usually train my students using the same foot first. Start with plain dolyo, then continue with peta or ap bal ap (depending on your instructor's term). I say 500-1000 times should make the respective side adapted. After mastering each sides, train the alternating foot. This will be harder as your hips will be twisted quite hard and (it has to be) fast. Other than that, you have to learn to control your body balance as well.
     
  9. Finlay

    Finlay Active Member

    A training method from Stefan Tapilatu was based on sprint training. He said from training speed he did a lot of sprints and kicks but starting from a lying position. Basically you lie face down on the floor and the get up and sprint forward or do a kick as fast as you can.

    This works on brining your knee up quickly, the first part of a kick and maybe the slowest, and takes your mind off actually kicking so you won't tense up as much.
     
    Gnarlie likes this.
  10. Finlay

    Finlay Active Member

    A training method from Stefan Tapilatu was based on sprint training. He said from training speed he did a lot of sprints and kicks but starting from a lying position. Basically you lie face down on the floor and the get up and sprint forward or do a kick as fast as you can and lie back down again

    This works on brining your knee up quickly, the first part of a kick and maybe the slowest, and takes your mind off actually kicking so you won't tense up as much.
     
    Gnarlie likes this.
  11. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I love that drill, it works on getting the knee up but also improves strength and flexibility in the forward range for kicks like naeryo chagi and apchagi.
     
  12. akisbat

    akisbat Member

    I like this one ! Sounds great
     

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