Yeop Chagi

Discussion in 'General Taekwondo Discussions' started by Gnarlie, Sep 28, 2015.

  1. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Why is it important though (I know it's wrong but leaving that aside)? I only rechamber due to kicking air and practicing balance. To have a beginning, middle and end, since there is no target to fall back on.
     
  2. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    You may wish to kick more than once.

    The chamber and rechamber muscle sets and motions are also prerequisites for many other kicks e.g. Dwi Hurigi, Huryo Chagi, more advanced side kick variants and many rotating techniques involving a jump.

    It's not that rechambering is always necessary, it's that rechambering gives you options where not rechambering does not.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     
  3. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Exactly, now do you understand why it never competed in TaeKwonDo, being that I can't throw kicks in succession/combos? I can enter stop format competitions, and Muay Thai, but not kick oriented, TKD rules. No way, jose. Their footwork is too good, they throw kicks in succession, in combinations, and they can perform aerials, which I really can't in that natural way.

    This type of turning kick does not lend itself to continous fighting, against guys who kick and defends against kicks 80-95% of the time, and I would have to work on my post kick strategies as well. I would lose 12-0 on the scorecards against any half decent opponent if I don't KO. Seriously..

     
  4. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    I still like working on my TKD and documenting how much, if at all, I improve. That's what life is all about. Improving. Life is not about getting thrown in with a bunch of sharks in a rule set tailor-made for them, and tailor-made against me.
     
  5. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    And you want to tell us their punching and defence is crap to validate your abilities. I understand. But it just doesn't work like that. Competitive fighting is totally different to dojang sparring. Anyone with any kind of experience and ability realises in or even before the first round that their opponent is a poor kicker and concentrates on exploiting that.

    Part of exploiting that in TKD is defending the punch with good footwork and good hands, and punishing the body with penetrating kicks to cause the opponent to defend the body, gradually removing the punch as an effective weapon for them as they try to stay out of range or cover. As the clinch is not an issue, this works.

    Under other rules where the clinch is an issue, and the distance is harder to control, other tactics are employed.

    So you really need to be painfully dominated in a competition to understand that what you think works and how it actually is are two different things. The chances of you KOing anyone are minimal compared to you being TKO'd by a sharp back kick, for example.

    Same applies in MT rules. You'll get cut down by low kicks before you get in range with any kind of commitment to a KO punch.

    I'm not saying this to be mean, or because I think you are deluded as so many others have. I am saying it because based on my experience, what you have been saying is absurd when weighed against typical strategies of competent competitors in the ring.

    In the Dojang, nobody is going to use pain as a compliance tool - they are not going to spear you with side and back kicks, or leave you unable to stand with low kicks. You are their sparring partner. Partner is an important word, because you help each other learn and probably want to do so again regularly. In the ring, you are an opponent. That is a very different thing.

    Sparring as opponents can be valuable, but both participants need to know that that is what is happening. You would need to discuss it directly and openly beforehand. Otherwise, conclusions about your performance that are drawn from sparring are unreliable and will only help so much in a ring context - and you'll piss of your sparring partner.

    See Charlie Zellenoff.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     
  6. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    No, I don't. I told you that I can't land much kicks on them but punches EASY. The vast majority of competitors have no control whatsoever over their punches and defence against punches in sparring. Zero form. Zero. It is an ugly sight. Jong Soo Park has suggested dropping the contact format in ITF for this reason, so I am not alone with this opinion. I followed them for 4 years, all the world events were put on Youtube. On mitts? Not as bad some might think. But looking flashy punching a mitts and actually punching under pressure are two completely different things. A select group punch alright, but a very select one.
     
  7. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Not neccesarily. Ray Mercer never got chopped down by Musashi and went the distance. Depends on the kicker and the reciever. Mercer was a dinousar when they fought, though.
     
  8. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Oh, so that spinning back kick that knocked me down was not a spear? Hmmm... Believe what you want. I have sparred harder than their silly format at world events, and they are very vulnerable to punches. Especially against someone who is used to sparring against kicks.
     
  9. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    You can control range with lead leg side kicks perfectly well, especially in an open arena compared to a ring. A puncher can not close the gap unless he is allowed to grab the leg. But I did make the point that they (TKDoins) are vulnerable when going on the offense against someone who is both used to kicks (which I am) is not going to throw one back,instead focused on countering with punches. They only time I got in trouble was when I kicked myself because that was stepping into their world, and I could not match them there, and it made me more vulnerable to getting tagged by those very kicks.
     
  10. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Nobody serious is saying that I am deluded. Are you getting your information from trolls on Bullshido? The vast majority are very positive to what I post. A boxer turned coach even admitted that I might very well KO him inside 2 rounds but still thought that he could offer input, which I found laughable. "Those who can do, those who can't preach".:rolleyes:
     
  11. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I mean you specifically will. I've seen how you punch.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     
  12. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    No, spears don't knock down. Pushes do. You've clearly never been speared. You would know it.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     
  13. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    No, I get my info from training in Korea.

    You're posts are everywhere, identifiable by you spelling errors and videos, and people give you generally the same feedback.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     
  14. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    I disagree with many of your points here but I can't be bothered to explain it. You will learn if you compete, and if you don't you won't.

    Nobody will take your views seriously until you do. You seem to want that.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     

Share This Page