Yeop Chagi

Discussion in 'General Taekwondo Discussions' started by Gnarlie, Sep 28, 2015.

  1. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    What about these ones? Is my technique consistent from day to day? First two are just warm-ups.

    This is from a few months back.

     
  2. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    The arm out posture also appears in the Taegeuk poomsae but for a very specific purpose. As a basic kick I prefer a guard as it adds protection and mass to the upper body.

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  3. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Still the same. The overrotation of the hip is very evident post kick on the rechamber - it looks like back kick chamber. I would encourage you to slow down and examine the kick path during and after the kick. Try keeping your top shoulder back throughout. It trains a different muscle set.

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  4. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    The doggo is cute.

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  5. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Yes I noticed it's a permanent trait. Things I like about them : momentum, speed, upperbody posture, consistency - all 3 kicks are all comparable to each other in quality.

    What I don't like about them: foot control - doesn't have to follow the book, but tensing it is much preferable. I hope my foot gets back to normal soon. It's not a great area of mine but I can certainly do a better job than that.
     
  6. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    ,
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2019
  7. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Not too shabby? We are making some progress, home alone:cool:

    :

     
  8. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Still overrotated. Look at your post kick - the kick knee is low and pointed mostly away from the target due to the overrotation of the upper body. That's bad.

    Get your right shoulder back and bring the kick back along the same line that it went in. Then put it down. This affords the opportunity to kick again if required and minimises the likelihood of sliding up the target.

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  9. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    I am overrotated post kick, not during extention (or at the very least not by as much as before). I can't retract it along the same lines that it went out. This is permanent stiffness in my body which makes me overrotated post kick, and yes it is undesirable of course.
     
  10. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member


    Also during extension.

    Can't? Or don't know how to train for it?



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  11. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    Can't. I don't rechamber during sparring, or throw it from the rear leg though.
     
  12. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    Very telling.

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  13. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    They have improved though along with better knee action. Getting rid of knee cocked down syndrome

    Here's my front leg side kicks today:



    And here's before:

     
  14. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    At least they're better than this guys who'm Rogan can't stand watching:D


     
  15. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    The post kick action is also knee down.

    The pre kick has got better though. I do agree. This should be an indicator to you of what is possible with training. Why would you use the word "can't"?

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  16. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    The strange thing is that I have not really changed my technique, it's feels more like an extra muscle added whenever I throw the kick which supports this modification. My flexibility has not improved either, so it's a bit of a mystery.. It would be interesting to see if I would've have done better lead leg sidekicking this way in sparring, because my old lead leg sidekicks never connected. It was completely useless.
     
  17. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    The rechamber didn't move an inch. I can't rely on forward momentum retracting as I do lashing out.
     
  18. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    It is a different and new muscle set, namely the lats and hip abductors for the kicking leg, and gluteus, hamstring and adductors in the standing leg. Not locking out the standing knee helps. So practice very slowly to build muscle and balance. Relying solely on momentum is a bad idea - it's very difficult to control and change once initiated. I do not believe for a second that you could not develop this if you focused on the right exercises.

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  19. Pleonasm

    Pleonasm Active Member

    I'm curious Gnarlie, if somebody were to ask you what I practised between Kung Fu, Karate and TaeKwonDo, would you be able to mechanically discern that it was your own martial art of TKD? If yes, what would be the marker?
     
  20. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Well-Known Member

    It would be hard to say from your 2 second videos. What is easy to identify are the gaps between what is there and what is mechanically correct for TKD.

    I think if we spent an hour together face to face training, you'd have the right exercises and understanding of the target motion to develop it to competence within a few months and then work on perfecting it for the rest of your life, like everyone does.

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